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| YOU |
(scroll down if injured)

The core of AllWorld services is striving to improve client conditions in meaningful and lasting ways. How would you like to enhance yourself and your athletic pursuits? Here are just a few common responses:

Quicken reaction times
Improve technique & consistency
Improve relationships with coaches & teammates
Reduce competitive anxiety
Speed recovery and healing time
Reduce injuries
Boost confidence & enhance focus
Stay mindful in key situations
Enhance well-being & happiness
Ease my departure from the sport

Achieving these goals in the 21st century is different than in the past. Athletes have always wanted to reach their potential, but modern sport sciences are enabling them to improve more efficiently than ever before. These sciences, including sport psychology, have also become more accessible to athletes at every level than even a decade ago. It's an exciting time to be an aspiring athlete, seeking personal bests.

| US |

Our collaboration always begins with your specific short- and long-term goals, interests, and circumstances. In general, though, we can say performing well and enjoying sport, in most cases, includes three fundamental skills, which may affect achieving the aforementioned benefits and, ultimately, success

(1)  awareness of what's going on inside (e.g., emotions, muscle tension, skills, beliefs),
(2)  awareness of what's happening in the environment (e.g., practice, competitions, life), and
(3)  responding to those factors optimally.

Sport performance doesn't occur in a vacuum. Our thoughts, emotions, tendencies, personal histories, relationships, and more affect our ability to perform well and to feel fulfilled (see the Reflect.Learn.Evolve Blog). By helping you be more mindful of what's going on inside of you and in your environment, and by developing the skills to optimally respond to those conditions, your performance and well-being will likely improve* (see "recent client benefits" on the Examples | Partners page). Likewise, the skills and growth internalized in collaboration and in sport may continue to enrich your life well beyond the original objectives years after we've concluded. Such far-reaching factors and benefits make it easier to see why, for example, all three U.S. Olympic Training Centers, like many of the world's top facilities, are staffed with sport psychology professionals and resources.

| ACTION |

To learn more about sport psychology collaboration, checkout an article I wrote for Swim Bike Run St. Louis, Sport psychology: What it is, what it isn't, and how it may help (includes embedded web links, bookmarks, and my own personal voice introduction). For convenient alerts and ongoing benefits (e.g., tips, research findings, surveys, event alerts, and more), be sure to join the AllWorld.Newsletter (email) and the AllWorld.ActionWire (text message). Further yet, you can skillfully use articles and books (see the Reading Lists page) to open dialogue with coaches, parents, and other athletes about interests and concerns: "So John, I was reading this article about ___ and it said ___. What do you think about that?" You get the idea.

You can also save time by contacting me directly to explore how we may specifically enhance your (or your team's) performance and enjoyment - good collaboration planning doesn't occur in isolation.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself, regardless if we have a good fit and work together:

Is there a limited window for these goals or opportunities?
What if I do nothing? How may I feel?
What may success, or my best effort, be worth now and in the future?
May there be a particular duration to the benefits in contrast to the initial costs?

Why not me?


* Andersen, M. B., & Mannion, J. (2011). If you meet the Buddha on the football field - tackle him! In D. Gilbourne & M. B. Andersen (Eds.), Critical essays in sport psychology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

* Gardner, F. L., & Moore, Z. E. (2004). A mindfulness-acceptance-commitment-based approach to athletic performance enhancement: Theoretical considerations. Behavior Therapy, 35, 707-723.
   

 


                     

| YOU |

Injury has the potential to evoke a wide variety of responses and consequences, depending on the location of the injury, the severity, and the meaning of sport in our lives. Anger, frustration, depression, and even a sense of happiness or relief can be understandable reactions.

The core of AllWorld services is striving to improve client conditions in meaningful and lasting ways. How would you like to enhance yourself and your rehabilitation process? Here are just a few familiar responses:

Improve relationships with rehab staff
Find more support & encouragement
Better my understanding of the injury
Find constructive activities for downtime

Become more involved with the team
Ease my departure from the sport
Find outlets to vent difficult feelings & thoughts
Maintain performance & happiness

Like sport training, the science of injury rehabilitation is much more advanced in the 21st century. Modern sport sciences, including sport psychology, are helping athletes recover, both physically and emotionally, more efficiently and are more accessible at every level than ever before.

| US |

Like sport performance, injury rehabilitation doesn't occur in a vacuum. Relationships with everyone from the surgeon to significant others, personal tendencies, mental skills ranging from coping to scientifically-validated mental healing techniques, and more can affect the quality and speed of recovery (see the Reflect.Learn.Evolve Blog). By helping you be more mindful of what's happening in you and in your environment, and by developing the skills to respond well to those conditions, healing and the return to sport may be expedited and enhanced (see "recent client benefits" on the
Examples | Partners page). These skills may even enhance your future sport performance and your ability to effectively handle adversity outside of sport.*

| ACTION |

To learn more about psychological considerations for injury and rehabilitation, check an article I wrote for Swim Bike Run St. Louis, When it hurts too bad to play: The psychology of injury and rehab (includes embedded web links, bookmarks, and my own personal voice introduction). For convenient alerts and ongoing benefits (e.g., tips, research findings, surveys, event alerts, and more), be sure to join the AllWorld.Newsletter (email) and the AllWorld.ActionWire (text message). Further yet, you can use articles and books (see the Reading Lists page) to open dialogue with rehab staff, coaches, parents, and other athletes about interests and concerns: "So Doc, I was reading this article about ___ and it said ___. What do you think about that?" You get the idea.

You can also save time by contacting me directly to explore how we may specifically collaborate to support and optimize your recovery - good collaboration planning doesn't occur in isolation.

Here are a few questions to ask yourself, regardless if we have a good fit and work together:

Is there a limited window for recovery?
What may better relationships with rehab staff, teammates, or significant others be worth?
Could I be handling this injury better? How much may malingering cost me?
Does the downtime offer new opportunities?

Why not me?


* Andersen, M. B., & Mannion, J. (
2011). If you meet the Buddha on the football field - tackle him! In D. Gilbourne & M. B. Andersen (Eds.), Critical essays in sport psychology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

* Gardner, F. L., & Moore, Z. E. (2004). A mindfulness-acceptance-commitment-based approach to athletic performance enhancement: Theoretical considerations. Behavior Therapy, 35, 707-723.

 
 
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